After fooling around with other methods, we finally accepted the advice I got on the Wicket IRC channel and used Terracotta to cluster our Wicket-based apps running under Jetty. It turned out to be straightforward to implement. The first thing to do was to add the Terracotta dependencies to our pom.xml. [sourcecode language=”xml”] org.terracotta.session terracotta-session 1.1.1 org.terracotta terracotta-toolkit-1.1-runtime 2.0.0 [/sourcecode] Then you just need to add a Terracotta filter to the jetty WebAppContext as follows: [sourcecode language=”java”] FilterHolder tcFilterHolder = new FilterHolder(TerracottaJetty61xSessionFilter.class); tcFilterHolder.setInitParameter(“tcConfigUrl”, “terracotta:9510,terracotta2:9510”); context.addFilter(tcFilterHolder, “/*”, Handler.ALL); [/sourcecode] That’s it. Terracotta will cluster the session (in the example we’re using two terracotta servers called “terracotta” and “terracotta2” – a main server and a standby). We’re using a HAProxy load-balancer with[…]

We are now deploying to our staging servers from our Maven repository using wget (the url is like ‘http://maven:8080/nexus/service/local/artifact/maven/redirect? r=snapshots&g=com.armstrongconsulting.controlcenter.server &a=controlcenterwebapp&v=LATEST&e=jar&c=jar-with-dependencies’.). The runnable jars (or wars) in the Maven repository are built, unit-tested and deployed to Maven by Continuum automatically. If any errors are found, the developer who made the offending commit to SVN is informed by Continuum. Works great, highly recommended. Thanks to Gabriel for setting it all up.